Preparing Yourself For Ramadan!

As Salam Alaikum friends! I’ve been away a while and have gotten a writer’s block, unfortunately, but I’m back and I’ve missed you all! 🙂

Today’s post is about preparing for the wonderful month of Ramadan, which is quickly approaching. This year (2012), in the USA, Ramadan begins on Friday, July 20th. Note that most Muslims start observing the celebration the night before at sunset, which would be on the 19th, Insha’Allah.

Although Ramadan is always on the same day of the Islamic calendar, the date on the Gregorian calendar varies from year to year, since the Gregorian calendar is a solar calendar and the Islamic calendar is a lunar calendar. This difference means Ramadan moves in the Gregorian calendar approximately 11 days every year. The date of Ramadan may also vary from country to country depending on whether the moon has been sighted or not.

A little explanation about the holy month of Ramadan:

Observance of Ramadan is also mandated in the Quran’s second chapter, verses 183-185.

During the month of Ramadan, adult Muslims engage in ritual fasting from sunup to sundown. This practice, Sawm, which is the same as fasting, is one of the five pillars of Islam, and requires that individuals abstain from eating, drinking, smoking and sexual intercourse. Each evening, Muslims will break the fast at sundown with Iftar, a traditional meal often beginning with the eating of dates — an homage to a practice of Muhammad.

All Muslims are expected to observe the fast once they reach the age of puberty.

In general, the practices of Ramadan are meant to purify oneself from thoughts and deeds that are counter to Islam. By removing material desires, one is able to focus fully on devotion and service to God. Many Muslims go beyond the physical ritual of fasting and attempt to purge themselves of impure thoughts and motivations — anger, cursing, greed, etc. As part of this, service to the community and to those in need is a major emphasis of activity throughout the month.

The holiday of Eid ul-Fitr, which marks the end of Ramadan, takes place on the first day of the following month and celebrates the completion of the 30 days of fasting. On this day, morning prayers are followed by feasting and celebration among family and friends. Eid is a day of great thanksgiving for Muslims — an opportunity to show their gratitude for making it through the month of fasting and a chance to share their blessings with others.

There some exceptions as far as those who are not obligated to fast. People who are ill, pregnant and breastfeeding women (if they feel it would harm the baby), someone traveling, a woman during her menses (but must resume once menses ends), one who is not in a healthy state of mind, children, elderly if they are not healthy. Some of these reasons are only temporary and must be made up before the next Ramadan.

Preparing yourself for Ramadan:

Here are some ideas that may be of use to you as ways to help you prepare for fasting Ramadan.

1. To help condition your heart for this blessed month, intensify your worship before Ramadan begins. Just a small, consistent amount is enough. The Prophet (peace be upon him) told us: “The deeds most loved by Allah are those done regularly, even if they are small.” (Bukhari, Muslim)

For example, say I always pray 2 raka (units )of sunnah (compulsory prayer) after isha’ (the night prayer) from this day until Ramadan begins—and even through Ramadan, let me make the intention that I will now pray 2 extra raka of sunnah after isha’. And every time I pray these extra 2 raka, which are more than what I normally pray, let me remember that I am doing these with the intention of asking Allah (swt) to help me be prepared to strive and exert my utmost effort during Ramadan.

2. Make a Dua list! This is THE MONTH to ask for EVERYTHING, both related to this life and the Next. Let us not wait until the last 10 nights to make special dua, and then once `Eid passes realize that we completely forgot about fifty other things we needed to make dua’ for. Let’s start making our lists now, and add to it as more things come our way. Insha’Allah this should help us remember to make constant dua’ in this month where dua is accepted, and help our hearts pour out to the One Who can make those dua happen, subhanahu wa ta’ala.

3. Write out your objectives for Ramadan. Praying all of your fard (obligatory) prayers? Praying all of your sunnahs? Reading the entire Qur’an? Giving $1 in charity a day? Making itikaaf (a time for reflection and prayer in seclusion) in the masjid? Leaving one serious sin that you’ve been trying to get away from for some time now? Sincerely turning back to Allah (swt)? Write out a list, put it somewhere you will see it, and make dua’ for your success in fulfilling your objectives.

4. Make a plan. Look at your objectives and try to plan out how to realize them in this month. For example, perhaps you are really struggling to pray your sunnah prayers. In this month, realize the enormity of the ajr (reward) of praying the sunnah prayers. Think that perhaps these sunnah will be the deeds that will be heavy on your scale of good deeds when you are intensely in need of them—on Yawm al-Qiyamah, the Day of Judgment. Therefore, fight to keep doing them all throughout Ramadan. If you can’t pray your 2 raka after dhuhr (the afternoon prayer) right away, make sure to do them as soon as you get the chance.

These are just some simple ways to ready yourself this year.

So many Muslims have passed away since last month. So many people have not made it to Ramadan this year. Last year was their very last Ramadan. Will you make it to this Ramadan? Will this be your last Ramadan?

Aim to strive this Ramadan. With a very small amount of effort, such as just making a small intention or adding a few extra acts of worship, we pray that Allah (swt) will help our hearts soften and honor us with making it easy to turn to Him and open up to Him.

May Allah (swt) make us of the successful in Ramadan, and make it easy for us to turn to Him completely and perpetually. Ameen.

Love, Amani

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Just a few Islamophobic leading politicians and opinion makers in the USA….See their comments….

As Salam Alaikum friends! I hope you are all having a great morning so far.

So, Ive been thinking about prejudices and phobics lately. We all know there are prejudices against all types of people, races, religions, etc, but I found a couple to be most disturbing while reading lately. Islamophobia is on the rise and here are a just a few leading politicians and opinion makers in the United States (my own country!) comments on Islam and Muslims, etc.

  • “The nation has been invaded by a fanatical, murderous cult… We should invade their countries, kill their leaders, and convert them to Christianity.” – Syndicated columnist Ann Coulter, National Review Online, September 2001
  • “We’re not attacking Islam, but Islam has attacked us. The God of Islam is not the same God. He’s not the son of God of the Christian or Judeo-Christian faith. It’s a different God, and I believe it is a very evil and wicked religion.” – Franklin Graham, NBC Nightly News, November 2001
  • “Islam is, quite simply, a religion of war, and Muslims should be encouraged to leave. They are a fifth column in this country.” – Lloyd Lind, Free Congress Foundation
  • “I think Mohammed was a terrorist.” – Jerry Falwell, on CBS 60 Minutes, October 2002
  • “I believe that Muslims in this country are a fifth column…The vast majority of Muslims in this country are very obviously loyal, not to the United States, but to their religion…the reason they are here is to take over our culture and eventually take over our country…You think we should befriend them; I think we should kill them.” – Jay Severin, host of a popular Boston area morning talk show on WTKK-FM, April 2004
  • “Muslims attacked us because we’re a Christian nation, because our foundation and roots are Judeo-Christian and the enemy is a guy named Satan…We in the army of God, in the house of God, in the kingdom of God have been raised for such a time as this,” – LT. General William G. Boykin, October 2003

Can’t ya just feel the hate here? Wow…well the statements speak for themselves and these are the types of people of our news stations, media, government and MILITARY!!! No wonder Americans who don’t know Islam are swayed to think of it as evil :/

In closing…May Allah keep you happy, healthy and safe Ameen

Love, Amani

 

What Happened to our Ummah?!

As Salam Alaikum friends. I hope you are well today and having a great day. I’m actually having a very good day today because I got to spend some time with a woman who is looking to studying Islam and eventually revert. Masha’Allah! She’s actually a neighbor of mine and I believe Allah brought us together under odd circumstances though, none the less lol. She has asked me to help her study! Alhamdulilah, masha’Allah…what an honor to teach someone the deen!

I felt compelled for a while now to write whats been in my heart about our Muslim community (ummah). Ummah, an Islamic Arabic term, means “community” or “nation”. Now the reason I wanted to write about this today is because the sister I am helping told me that she could not find any other willing sisters to help her study and learn our beautiful Islam! I was shocked but in a way I wasn’t.

It never ceases to amaze me anymore, with all the “every man/woman for him/herself” mentality going around. This is not Islam brothers and sisters. Our ummah is in trouble and has been for many years. My belief is that after our beloved Prophet died, and his companions, so did our ummah. No longer can we count on each other to take time out of our days to help another in need. Yet, we can be on Facebook (me too) and watch T.V., or any other thing that we do that takes away from our duties as Muslims. I am also guilty of this as well, which lead me to change in a small way by helping this young woman out. It makes me feel wonderful knowing dawah is happening! I also consider her a friend as well which as we know Allah brings us together for many reasons.

Next time you see someone sitting alone in the masjid, please, at least say your salams and maybe ask how they are. Especially if they are a new face. In my previous blog about my recent trip to the masjid, I stressed that it was an unpleasant experience, as it was. And it wasn’t the first time no one spoke to me while being alone and after giving my salams. This is exactly what I’m talking about. UMMAH!!! What happened to it?!!

What’s the solution? There may be many ways to help the situation. First off, passing judgement on other brothers and sisters of Islam ruins community (ummah). Lets face it, who wants to learn from or be around someone who is always judging them. Instead politely correct if you can, those things that you see may be wrong. It’s then up to the person to correct and for Allah to judge. Another way is to, again, reach out to others in need. Welcome new reverts with open arms as they are the fragile ones and there is currently no care for them. They take their shahada….everyone is all “Masha’Allah!!”, then BAM!, everyone’s gone! Where did everyone go. It doesn’t stop at the welcome into Islam. It should be a constant help towards those in need. I need to remind myself in this also as with everything I am writing, which is why I wanted to blog this topic.

Also, if you can, volunteer in the Muslims community for things such as helping other learn Arabic or English, which ever you speak and depending on the need. Help others learn some surahs to help them with their prayers. Teach someone that’s just reverting the 5 pillars of Islam as they are the fundamentals.

There are many other ways that I may not even be aware of but I ask if you can please comment with your suggestions. Also, what are your feelings about the state of our Ummah?

As always, May Allah keep you happy, healthy and safe. Ameen.

Love, Amani

 

Learning the Five Pillars of Islam part 5 – Hajj

As Salam Alaikum friends! I hope you are all well.

Now we are down to the last pillar in Islam out of five total. Hajj (the Islamic pilgrimage), is the 5th pillar.

Performance of the Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca) is required of every adult Muslim, male or female, if physically and financially possible. Many Muslims spend their entire lives saving and planning for this journey; others make the pilgrimage more than once if they are able.

The requirements for performing the pilgrimage are as follows:

  • Maturity and sound mind, in order to understand the significance of the pilgrimage experience;
  • Physical capability to travel and perform the pilgrimage rites;
  • Financial stability, free of debt, so that one is able to bear the pilgrimage expenses as well as provide for dependents during travel.

For one who meets these criteria, performing the pilgrimage is obligatory.

When undertaking the pilgrimage, Muslims shed all signs of their wealth and societal distinctions by donning simple white garments, commonly called ihram. The required pilgrimage dress for men is two white cloths, one of which covers the body from the waist down, and one that is gathered around the shoulder. Women usually wear a simple white dress and headscarf, or their own native dress. The ihram is a symbol of purity and equality, and signifies that the pilgrim is in a state of devotion.

While wearing ihram, there are other requirements that Muslims follow in order to focus their energy on spiritual devotion. Harming any living thing is forbidden — no hunting, fighting, or vulgar language is permitted. Vanity is discouraged, and Muslims approach pilgrimage in as natural a state as possible: excessive perfumes and colognes are not used; hair and fingernails are left in their natural state without trimming or cutting. Marital relations are also suspended during this time, and marriage proposals or weddings are delayed until after the pilgrimage experience is completed.

Every year, millions of Muslims from around the world make the journey to Mecca, Saudi Arabia, for the annual pilgrimage (or Hajj). Dressed in the same simple white clothing to represent human equality, the pilgrims gather to perform rites dating back to the time of Abraham.

During these historic days, white, brown and black people, rich and poor, kings and peasants, men and women, old and young will all stand before God, all brothers and sisters, at the holiest of shrines in the center of the Muslim world, where all will call upon God to accept their good deeds. These days represent the zenith of every Muslim’s lifetime.

The Hajj resembles the re-enactment of the experiences of the Prophet Abraham, whose selfless sacrifice has no parallel in the history of humankind.

The Hajj symbolizes the lessons taught by the final prophet, Muhammad, who stood on the plain of Arafat, proclaimed the completion of his mission and announced the proclamation of God: “This day have I perfected your religion for you, completed my favor upon you, and have chosen for you Islam, or submission to God, as your religion” (Quran 5:3).

This great annual convention of faith demonstrates the concept of equality of mankind, the most profound message of Islam, which allows no superiority on the basis of race, gender or social status. The only preference in the eyes of God is piety as stated in the Quran: “The best amongst you in the eyes of God is most righteous.”

During the days of the Hajj, Muslims dress in the same simple way, observe the same regulations and say the same prayers at the same time in the same manner, for the same end. There is no royalty and aristocracy, but humility and devotion. These times confirm the commitment of Muslims, all Muslims, to God. It affirms their readiness to leave the material interest for his sake.

The Hajj is a reminder of the Grand Assembly on the Day of Judgment when people will stand equal before God waiting for their final destiny, and as the Prophet Muhammad said, “God does not judge according to your bodies and appearances, but he scans your hearts and looks into your deeds.”

The Quran states these ideals really nicely (49:13): “O mankind! We created you from a single (pair) of a male and a female, and made you into nations and tribes, that ye may know each other (not that ye may despise (each other)). Verily the most honored of you in the sight of God is (he who is) the most righteous of you. And God has full knowledge and is well acquainted (with all things).”

Insha’Allah we can all make Hajj one day. I know I can’t wait until I am able insha’Allah 🙂

Love Amani. May Allah bless you and keep you happy , healthy and safe. Ameen

My Recent Experience at the Masjid (Mosque)

As Salam Alaikum friends! Hope you are all doing well today.

Today I’m breaking away from the technical stuff associated with Islam and posting a personal story of mine, my recent trip to the masjid. VERY UNCOMFORTABLE EXPERIENCE!

Now, everyone knows Muslims go to the masjid to pray and seek Allah primarily, but, there is a social aspect to it as well. Many people like to see friends and chat for a while before or after prayer. That’s normal. It’s a way to connect with our community. Sadly, we are losing our community to selfishness and rude behavior and I am a witness to that.

So, last Friday I went to Jummah prayer. I haven’t been to the masjid in a while before that day. That in itself should not matter as to how fellow Muslims treat you. Anyway, I walk into the prayer area and give my salams to the entire group of women in the room. Loud enough so that everyone can hear of course. What I get in return…..almost silence! A few salams back but nothing what I expected. Now, you might be thinking, “so what”, but, you have to understand this isn’t the first time this has happened to me.

I remember when I first reverted and would go to the masjid pretty often, even days other than Fridays. I would see the same faces. There were a couple sweet sisters who would chat with me, but the majority stuck to their little clicks. This is not what our ummah is supposed to be about. We are supposed to support each other, offer assistance when needed, give our salams, respect each other….what happened to all of this!

This is a real problem with new Muslims , as they need alot of assistance in learning the deen. When I first reverted , there were a few wonderful sisters who offered to help out but they have since stopped going to the masjid for whatever reason. Maybe the same reason I am choosing not to go back. YES, I said it…I am not going back. Women aren’t obligated to go anyway and if I am going to be treated like a piece of furniture, to be ignored, then I choose to pray to Allah in the comfort of my own home.

Now that I think about it, it may just be the masjid I attend but that’s doubtful. You see this treatment even outside of the masjid, on the streets even.

So, now my rant is over. I may consider looking into a different masjid or not. Right now I am bitter towards the whole idea. Allah will not reward me any less if I don’t attend so why feel uncomfortable while I am praying! Ugh.

Well friends, thanks for letting me vent and for reading. May Allah keep you happy, healthy and safe. Ameen

Salam, Amani

Learning the Five Pillars of Islam part 4 Fasting!

As Salam Alaikum friends!

Its been a while since I’ve posted due to being extremely busy with the kids being off for spring break. But, I’m back! Hope everyone who celebrates Easter had a great holiday. Muslims don’t celebrate it but that’s a whole other post 🙂

So we come to the4TH pillar of Islam…fasting! Many religions fast including Islam, Judaism, Christianity and others as well. Most for the purpose to attain a closer relationship to God. There are a variety of ways people fast and for many reasons. I will only be touching on Islam as that’s what this post is about.

There are an estimated 6 million to 7 million Muslims in America whose unique food practices are guided by religious laws and influenced by cultural differences.

Fasting in Ramadan
Ramadan is the name of the ninth month in the Islamic calendar year, which is based on the lunar cycle and consists of 12 months of 29 or 30 days each. Because the Islamic year is roughly 10 days shorter than the Gregorian one, Ramadan shifts yearly.

Fasting for Muslims means abstaining from all foods and beverages, including gum and water, as well as medication and smoking, from dawn to sunset. The two main meals of the day are suhur (immediately before dawn) and iftar (immediately after sunset). These mealtimes are also related to two of the five main prayers Muslims perform every day. Muslims may consume other meals or snacks at night. Aside from hunger and thirst, Ramadan bestows spiritual peace to Muslims; during Ramadan, acts of worship are highly intensified.

It is impossible to describe typical suhur or iftar meals, considering the high diversity of the Muslim American community. Suhur can be dinner, or iftar, leftovers, typical breakfast foods, or ethnic foods. Social gatherings, many times buffet style, at iftar are frequent, and traditional dishes are often highlighted. A few dates and a cup of water are usually the first foods to break the fast, while fried pastries, salads, nuts, legumes, and breads are common. Traditional desserts are often unavoidable, especially those made only during Ramadan. Water is usually the beverage of choice, but juice and milk are also consumed. Soft drinks and caffeinated beverages are consumed to a lesser extent.

While weight loss is certainly not the driving power behind fasting, it is not uncommon for some to take advantage of it to shed a few pounds. At the same time, many Muslims see no changes in their weight, while others may gain weight. I tend to gain weight, surprisingly due to eating in excess at night…which I do not recommend 🙂 Excess fried foods and desserts, overeating at buffet-style iftar parties, and reduced physical activity can be attributed to weight gain. Many Muslims aim for nutrient-dense foods to optimize nutrition and see fasting as a way to detox and allow the gut to rest.

Fasting and Medical Issues
Fasting does not pose any medical risks to healthy individuals.

Exemptions to fasting are travel, menstruation, illness, older age, pregnancy, and breast-feeding. However, many Muslims with medical conditions insist on fasting to satisfy their spiritual needs, and healthcare professionals must work with their patients to reach common ground. Professionals should closely monitor individuals who decide to persist with fasting.

The main chronic diseases of concern are diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, renal disease, and peptic ulcers. Care plans must be individualized, as many patients with these conditions can fast without adverse events. Compliance with medications may be an issue, especially for those on daily daytime dosages. For patients with diabetes, things to consider are feasibility of adjusting medication and insulin dose, clinical stability, history of hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis, and the presence of other comorbidities.

It is not just physical hunger and thirst that constitute the Muslim fast, but the nights prior to the beginning of the fast acquire a far more important character and play a central role in the institution of fasting. The Muslims wake up many hours before dawn for individual prayer and the remembrance of God. Also the Holy Quran is recited in every Muslim house much more than in ordinary days. A greater part of the night is thus spent in spiritual exercises which make upso the very essence of fasting.

During the day, apart from restraining from food and water, all is Muslims are particularly exhorted from vain talk, quarrels and fights, or from any such occupation as is below the dignity of a true believer. No indulgence in carnal pleasure is allowed; even husband and wife during the day lead separate lives, except for the formal human relationship common to all people.

In Islam, alms-giving and care for the destitute is so highly emphasized that it becomes part of a Muslim’s daily life. However when it comes to Ramadan, the month of fasting, Muslims are required to redouble their efforts in this field. It is reported of the Holy Prophet that spending in the cause of the poor was a routine daily practice with him which has been likened unto a breeze, never ceasing to bring comfort and solace to the needy. However during Ramadan, the reporters of the Ahadith — the sayings of the Holy Prophet (saw)– remind us that the breeze seemed to pick up speed and began to blow like strong winds. Alms-giving and care for the destitute are so highly emphasized, that in no period during the year do Muslims engage in such philanthropic purposes as they do during the month of Ramadan.

  1. Other obligatory fasting is most often related to the condoning of sins by God. This also includes violation of the obligatory fasts.

The optional fasting is so well promoted that it becomes a part of the righteous Muslim’s way of life. Although a majority of Muslims do not go beyond the month of obligatory fasting, some keep fasts now and then particularly when in trouble. As it is expected that the prayers offered in fasting are more productive, some people keep extra fasts to ward off their problems, but some do it only for the sake of winning Allah’s special favors. There no limit to this, except that the founder of Islam strongly discouraged those who had vowed to fast continuously for their whole life. When the Holy Prophet (saw) came to learn of one such case, he disapproved of the practice and censured the man for attempting to achieve liberation as if by forcing his will upon . He told the person concerned that: ‘Just by putting yourself to trouble or discomfort, not only will you be unable to please God, but you may even earn His displeasure.’ He pointed out that over emphasis on austerity is likely to make one negligent towards one’s wife and children, kith and kin, friends etc.

The Holy Prophet (saw) reminded him specifically of his responsibilities in the area of human relationship: ‘Do your duty to God as well as the creation of God equitably‘ was the advice. To some, after their insistent petulant begging, he permitted optional fasts only in the style of David, peace be upon him. The Holy Founder of Islam told them that it was the practice of David to fast one day and abstain from doing so the next. Throughout his life, after he made this vow, he kept the fast on alternate days. So the Holy Prophet (saw) said ‘I can only permit you that much and no more.’

The institution of fasting is extremely important because it cultivates the believer in almost every area of his spiritual life. Among other things, he learns through personal experience about what hunger, poverty, loneliness and discomforts mean to the less fortunate sections of society. Abstention from even such practices during the month of Ramadan as are permissible in everyday life plays a constructive role in refining the human character.

I hope this post has been beneficial to you and if you have any questions, please feel free to comment 🙂

Salam, Amani

May Allah keep you all happy, healthy and safe. Ameen

p.s. Pillar number 3 will be out of order due to a mistake made and will come shortly insha’Allah.

Learning the 5 pillars of Islam part 2 Prayer!

As Salam Alaikum friends. Hope your day is going well and that you are blessed.

Today we’ll learn about the second pillar in Islam which is Salat or “prayer”. Our days and nights are centered around prayer. We have 5 obligatory prayers each day and may pray more often and make supplications as much as possible if we wish. The more prayers the more rewards!

Allah has commanded us to pray because it purifies us, keeps Him in our hearts and on our tongue, curbs desires and elevates the mind to seek Him. It bring us closer to him and to our deen.

Islams 5 obligatory prayers are Fajr (morning), Dhur (afternoon), Asr (evening), and Isha (night). The times are dependent on where you live , time zone, etc. Muslims face front towards the Kaba in Mecca to pray because it has been commanded by Allah and its sunnah as our prophet did this as well. The direction will also depend on where you live. For example, I face northeast towards the Kaba.

Before prayer, it is necessary to cleanse oneself with a purification ritual called “wudu”. Wudu is the ritual cleaning of certain areas of your body before prayer and is needed so your prayer will be accepted. Basically what you do is first have your intention to cleanse for prayer, say Bis-Mi-lah (in the name of God), and start the ritual. Its as follows:

1. Wash both hands with water three times to wrist.

2. Wash out mouth with water three times.

3. Take water into nose by right hand, snort it out and wipe with left hand three times.

4. Wash face with water three times.

5. Start with right arm and wash right and left arms to elbow three times with water.

6. Take water and wipe front to back over hair 1 time.

7. With water, clean out the ear area with fingers and behinf ear with thumb 1 time.

8. Starting with right foot, wash feet with water to ankle 3 times.

Now you’re done! It actually is pretty quick, it just looks like a long list but it takes less than 5 minutes to perform.

Now you’re ready to pray, but first you must put those prayer clothes on! For women, a long dress or abayba/jilbab, is necessary and must be long enough to cover arms to wrists and down to feet. You may also wear pants with a long shirt that covers your bottom. I usually wear a long dress with pants under if going to the mosque. You also need to cover your hair with a head scarf and that includes neck, chest and ears. Men can wear a regular shirt, without logos on them and pants or shorts that cover below knees. Don’t forget to make sure the clothes are clean and free from dirt and / or bodily excrement’s including urine, blood, etc.

Things to note: Please recite only the Arabic portions during praying. Phrases are repeated at least twice in the audio files for your convenience. Recite the phrases only once during praying, unless otherwise mentioned. Some common Arabic Terms used: Surah = A Chapter of the Quran, Dua = Supplication

Ok NOW you’re ready to pray lol. Here’s how it goes…

1. Face the Kaba in Mecca…depends on your location as to which direction you will face.

2. Standing, you will start the prayer raising both hands up close to your ears and say “Allahu Akbar” (God is Most Great).

3. Then put one hand on the top of the other hand between your chest and upper stomach, and start reciting surah “al fatiha”, say “ameen” once you finish it, and then start reciting another small surah.

4. Once you finish reciting raise your hands up to the ears, saying “Allahu Akbar.” Bow (your hands on your knees, back straight, your face toward the ground, saying three times, “Subhana rabbiyal adheem” (Glory be to my Lord Almighty). This position is called (ruku’).

5. Rise back to standing while saying “Sami’a Allahu liman hamidah, Rabbana wa lakal hamd” (God hears those who call upon Him; Our Lord, praise be to You).

6. Raise hands up, saying “Allahu Akbar” then descend to the ground (see photo), while your face on the ground say three times “Subhana Rabbiyal A’ala” (Glory be to my Lord, the Most High). This position is called “sujud”

7. Rise to a sitting position saying “Allahu Akbar.”

8. Then prostrate back on the ground (this is the second time you do it), while your face on the ground say three times “Subhana Rabbiyal A’ala”

This will conclude the first “rak’a”. Now to start the second “raka’a” you simply need to repeat steps from 2 to 8. Note that at the end of your second “rak’a” you will have to add step 9, which is:

9. Rise to a sitting positition, remain sitting and recite the first part of the Tashahhud in Arabic:  “Atta-hiyyatu lillahi was-salawatu wat-tayyibatu As-salamu ‘ala an-Nabiyy wa rahmat-ullahi wa barakatuhu As-salamu ‘alaina wa ‘alaa ‘Ibaadillah-is-salihin. Ash-hadu-al-la-ilaha illAllahu wa ash-hadu anna Muhammadan ‘abduhu wa Rasuluh”. Note that while reciting “Ash-hadu-al-la ilaha illaAllahu …” one should move the index finger of the right hand in a small circle like you’re drawing a circle on the sand beach with your index while the hand is still on the thigh. Only the index should be moving, the rest of the fingers and hand don’t have to move.

10. If the prayer is to be longer than 2 “rak’as”, then add the same steps from 2 to 8 depending on how many “rak’as” you have to perfom, for example if you have to make 4 “rak’as” then you will have to add steps 2 to 8 two more times (which means 4 times in total). Then finally add the step number 9 again (basically after each two “rak’as” the step #9 is required).

11. To end your prayer, while still sitting, turn your face to the right and say “Assalamu alaikum wa rahmatullah” (Peace be upon you and God’s blessings), and turn to the left and say the same “Assalamu alaikum wa rahmatullah”. And that’s how you finish your prayer, easy!

Main prayers of the day:

1st prayer (Fajr) = 2 Rakats

2nd prayer (Dhuhr) = 4 Rakats

3rd prayer (Asr) = 4 Rakats

4th prayer (Magrib) = 3 Rakats

5th prayer (Isha) = 4 Rakats

So there you have it!! The Muslim prayer 🙂 I hope this was helpful to you and if I have left anything out or forgot to mention anything. I apologize. Please feel free to ask or comment on this in comment section!

As Salam Alaikum, Amani xoxo

May Allah bless you with happiness, health and safety. Ameen 🙂

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